Co-creator Lucas Maddock installs the new sculpture at Warrnambool’s Civic Green yesterday. A PIECE of the Great Ocean Road’s most iconic vista has popped up on Warrnambool’s Civic Green in the form of an 8.2-metre high resin sculpture.
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Called Apostle No. 2, the installation will remain on the city’s central park until after the May races and will be illuminated at night.

Art gallery director John Cunningham predicts it will trigger widespread community debate on public art.

“The Civic Green is our front garden so it’s the logical place for a major new piece to be displayed,” he said.

“This is a statement of our intent to raise the profile of public art it’s fun.”

The work is by Lucas Maddock and Isaac Greener of Melbourne.

It was previously seen at Federation Square where it won several awards and has been shortlisted for the McClelland Sculpture Survey this year.

It was inspired by the collapse of a 45-metre tall limestone stack among the 12 Apostles near Port Campbell on July 3, 2005.

The artists created their ghostly shell as parody of Australia’s obsession with big icons, but also to symbolise the ever-changing global environment and as a monument to the “shock of change”.

After they expressed an interest in taking it to the south-west, Mr Cunningham jumped at the opportunity.

“It was a no-brainer for me. Warrnambool is at the end of the Great Ocean Road and the artists were keen to have it here,” he said. “This is a $230,000 piece of art and we are only paying a very modest fee to cover the artists’ expenses.

“It has been erected with goodwill assistance from Ryan’s Transport and Warrnambool Crane Hire to be ready for the big Port Fairy Folk Festival weekend and May Racing Carnival where thousands of visitors come to the city.”

It has a five-tonne concrete block in its base to prevent it toppling over.

Warrnambool City Council and the arts community have been responsible for the installation of two new pieces of public art in the CBD during the past two years at a cost of about $20,000 each.

However, the program has been suspended this year to widen the scope and a new cultural arts policy is being proposed to the council.

Mr Cunningham hinted it would involve rejuvenation of the 700 or so pieces of public art he describes as “moveable heritage”.

“We want to reinvigorate and replant them. Our new policy calls for more flexibility,” he said.

“We want to send a signal to the people of Warrnambool asking what type of city do you want by 2030. It is hoped this will inspire and provoke an honest debate about how public art can and should be utilised in the city and celebrate the reopening of the Lighthouse Theatre in April.”

Last night the theatre’s new season program was officially unveiled at the gallery only metres away from the new outdoor artwork.

It was previously seen at Federation Square where it won several awards and has been shortlisted for the McClelland Sculpture Survey this year.

It was inspired by the collapse of a 45-metre tall limestone stack among the 12 Apostles near Port Campbell on July 3, 2005.

The artists created their ghostly shell as parody of Australia’s obsession with big icons, but also to symbolise the ever-changing global environment and as a monument to the “shock of change”.

After they expressed an interest in taking it to the south-west, Mr Cunningham jumped at the opportunity.

“It was a no-brainer for me. Warrnambool is at the end of the Great Ocean Road and the artists were keen to have it here,” he said. “This is a $230,000 piece of art and we are only paying a very modest fee to cover the artists’ expenses.

“It has been erected with goodwill assistance from Ryan’s Transport and Warrnambool Crane Hire to be ready for the big Port Fairy Folk Festival weekend and May Racing Carnival where thousands of visitors come to the city.”

It has a five-tonne concrete block in its base to prevent it toppling over.

Warrnambool City Council and the arts community have been responsible for the installation of two new pieces of public art in the CBD during the past two years at a cost of about $20,000 each.

However, the program has been suspended this year to widen the scope and a new cultural arts policy is being proposed to the council.

Mr Cunningham hinted it would involve rejuvenation of the 700 or so pieces of public art he describes as “moveable heritage”.

“We want to reinvigorate and replant them. Our new policy calls for more flexibility,” he said.

“We want to send a signal to the people of Warrnambool asking what type of city do you want by 2030. It is hoped this will inspire and provoke an honest debate about how public art can and should be utilised in the city and celebrate the reopening of the Lighthouse Theatre in April.”

Last night the theatre’s new season program was officially unveiled at the gallery only metres away from the new outdoor artwork.

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